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that promise for everybody, the cause of his life. as a civil rights attorney, an aide to senator ted kennedy, a member of the montgomery, maryland county council, tom fought for a level playing field, where hard work and responsibility are rewarded and working families can get ahead. and this is not the first time that he's chosen to be a labor secretary, either. we've got here today governor martin o'malley, and martin appointed tom as secretary of maryland's department of labor where he helped implement the country's first statewide living wage law. because he understood that a minimum wage should be a wage that you can live on. in his current role as the head of the u.s. justice department's civil rights division, he fought to open pathways to the work fos for everybody willing to contribute, and he's helped settle some of the largest cases ever on behalf of families targeted by unfair mortgage lending. now while he's tackled plenty of tough issues, tom has also spent a career as a consensus builder. he's worked with ceos, he's worked with labor leaders, he's worked at federal, state and
connected the future of israel to these young people, to the civil rights movement. in fact, to his own experience, saying that it's the promise of freedom, that they have to deal with peace, and he was cheered. there was one heckler, but he was overridden by the cheers, saying that their future is really in their hands and they have to deal with the palestinian question. only a democratic israel can remain as a jewish stated and fulfill the promises. i think he hit every note in talking about the promise of israel but also he did give some very specific messages. he repeated his warning to the assad regime not to dare use chemical weapons, which are of course a direct threat to israel as well, saying that the united states will respond. and he made a very strong iron-clad commitment on iran, another thing that israelis want to hear. >> you know, interesting you mention the heckler and you talk about the charm offensive. i believe it has been called operation desert schmooze by "the atlantic." he handled that very well. he got some laughs when he said, i wouldn't feel comfortable here i
. which moses did in the bible and dr. king obviously did here in america. to lead the civil rights movement. so i thought it was again, very sincere from president obama, and resonated a lot, i know jewish americans, i would guess with african-americans, also guess more broadly, with most americans, for whom the bible is still their favorite book. >> yesterday's speech when he was speaking to the students yesterday, i mean, personally i thought he hit it out of the park. there was so much applause there, he made so much common sense and i feel like he really struck an emotional tone and tried to connect with the people in the audience. how do you feel about what he said and do you think his words will resonate for some time to come? >> i thought it was an excellent speech. and yes i do think, i hope certainly that his words will resonate for some time to come. this was really a brilliantly constructed visit to israel. obviously he had long and apparently very constructive talks with prime minister netenyahu and with prime minister simon perez. but for the major address, he chose no
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